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8 thoughts on “defining”

  1. Most profound. I LOVE this post. I just had a successful recital experience and it was incredibly rejuvenating for my playing; it is completely true about offering up where I am at the time. It was exhilarating! (Although I did feel like throwing up for the 15 minutes leading up to it.)

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  2. Hmm…the shift from This is a reflection on me to Here’s a thing I have been working on that I would like to share.

    Wow – that must be feel nice! I guess I need to do more than 1 recital every 3 years to make that shift. I’ll work on that!

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  3. Given that in 2 weeks I am about to perform my first recital as an adult, 50 year old student of the cello, this definition is VERY timely! Thanks you Emily, as always!

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  4. Play and perform as much as you can! Brian: have fun at your recital, and maybe keep us updated on your approach to practice and the completely normal anxiety about the performance. Something to note: just because I have a pretty grounded approach to the whole thing doesn’t mean I don’t have fear. In fact, the most fear I have ever had was a few years ago, performing Haydn D in front of 30 of my students. But after a few notes, I realized that even the mistakes would be a great example of the essential humility of performance. Humility frees you from humiliation. Catchy, eh?

    All of this feedback really makes me want to start some sort of cello seminar weekend for adults one of these summers. Maybe Aspen or some other program would put us up. Wouldn’t that be fun?

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  5. I can think of at least 3 established cello camps where you would fit right in as faculty, and wouldn’t have the infrastructure issues to deal with. But… the problem with cello camps in lovely, far away places is the darn cello. Too hard to travel with, so you have a predominantly local draw. I haven’t found a camp that “orders in” the cellos so you don’t have to drive for days across country, brave the airlines (and their fees), or rent a cello and take care of shipping yourself.

    That said, that is exactly what I was thinking might be fun to do when you stop here or in DC over the summer. We could try setting up a practice mini-camp.

    Are you familiar with Burton Kaplan’s Magic Mountain practice retreats? Unfortunately, he only takes pros, but I audited a 2 day workshop (I think it’s called Performance Power). Highly worthwhile, and completely fascinating. One of my pet ideas (fantasies) is to translate that format for serious adult students. Serious, not implying advanced.

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  6. OMGOMGOMGOMGOMG – a cello camp run by Emily? That would be SO cool! Gottagopractise – you are singing my tune re: a summeer D.C. mini-camp if possible.

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  7. Well, I’m definitely stopping near you, because of the bow repair seminar I’m taking. That’s in July, almost August. I would love to come to DC in June, just for 4 days or something. I have the place to stay, and JetBlue will treat me right with the cello. It’s good timing also because school age kids drop in the summertime. I guess I would just have to sort out the prices so I wouldn’t hemorrhage like I did on my tour of the South, which was well worth it, mind you.

    I still need to get my text submitted, so that’s on the front burner. Maybe having a deadline like a trip to DC would be the thing to keep me on pace.

    More soon.

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  8. Oh, and GGP: I am not familiar with that particular retreat, but that is my idea. Serious, not necessarily advanced. And more advanced students should be required to teach as part of the course.

    That would be you. Teaching. Cello. 🙂

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