Author: Emily Wright

now hear this

My new podcast is up. It’s a short (7.30) workout for the Faure Elegie, and is typical of the way I have students work on a piece. check it...

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check it out again! (part 2 of 3)

Here are the next couple of outlined chapters. 11) D scale and intro to extensions (musical examples, 4 images, 2 pages)Extensions are the next pillar of good technique after the shift into 4th position. It’s easy to go awry when doing this technique, so the pictures are especially important. The ones I have included in the sample chapter are not final, but indicative of the detail I want to include. I may even want them larger, and the focus pulled out further to show the entire arm. 12) Avoiding injuries (2 pages, 3 images)As I said in my introduction, I was a lousy student. I was very resistant to changing my technique, and as a result nearly ended my career with the ensuing parade of injuries this caused. This chapter is all text, and it offers substantive information relating to my experience and that of my students. I end with what is a sort of mantra of mine: relaxed playing isn’t something that happens in addition to good technique. It is the essence of it. 13) F scale and more extensions (2 or 3 images, musical examples, 2 pages)More extensions, but this time, we take the technique down the neck instead of up it. I am trying to prime the students for things that they will likely see in the beginning months of study. After we play in G,...

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check it out! (part 1 of 3)

Have a look at the basic outline of my book. (or 1/3 of it, anyway!) This is just pasted from the proposal I send to OUP. Teachers and students! I call upon YOU to help me make this an undeniably useful and fabulous book. Of course I am not looking to poach innovative approaches, so if you are writing a method and do not want me to include your suggestions in my ruminations, please don’t comment! xxoo, emily 1) Body Concept and Positioning (10 images, 2 or 3 pages) The first few chapters are congruent to the typical first few lessons I give. In fact, much of the genesis of this book was because I realized that the first 50 pages of my students’ notebooks had the same exercises and technique tips and corrections. This chapter is heavy on the pictures and presents a dual approach to technique: general concepts; “Position on the instrument is like a series of gentle curves based upon a square frame” and detailed description; “The emphasis of the bow grip is the right index finger, where the weight of the entire arm travels from the shoulder, through the elbow, the wrist, and finally comes to rest, in a single point, on the finger.” All examples have pictures that bring the technique to life. There is nothing worse than someone trying to explain a complicated...

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the bow

der bogen l’arco de buiging 大提琴弓 (that last one is my personal favorite) To me, the left hand is academic, and the right hand is, though rigorously technical, laced with the perfume of mystery and tacit knowledge of finesse. Oh yes, when Emily starts busting out the wordcraft, you know she’s got something brewing. There is much talk of the independence of the hands. I understand the genesis of this, (don’t shoot through a mile of bow when you shift, fast notes do not equal fast bow) but in the end, I think that a better way to approach it is to make them as interconnected as possible. The right hand should contribute to the efforts of the left hand. It colors, emboldens and, at root, voices the left hand’s otherwise silent input. This topic warrants more than a multi paragraph blog, but we have to start somewhere. I had a little back and forth with another cello blogger who was duking it out with a triplet passage in a concerto. One thing I mentioned was the idea of a digital bow motion. By digital, I mean 1 or 0. On or off. Moving, or not moving. I find that many of my advanced students (and this guy is definitely advanced) struggle with this issue. They get “garbage” creeping into their sound: little pops and pings during string crossings,...

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